Masters Golf

Masters Golf 2019 Live : The Masters is one of the four major championships in men’s professional golf. The biggest names in golf are gearing up for the 2019 Masters knowing they all have genuine shot at lifting the prestigious trophy. As the year’s first major approaches, golf fans might care more about the answer to that question than they do about the status of their own golf

Phil Mickelson will miss the cut. Lefty has missed two cuts in the last five Masters despite his stellar play over most of his career. It’s hot here in Augusta, and the Masters is going to get away from someone quickly. If Mickelson is not nails on Thursday.

it may be over before it even starts for him.Wallace, making his Masters debut this week, went three rounds of sudden death with Sandy Lyle at Wednesday’s competition, winning with a birdie on the third hole.

“I wanted to hole that putt on the last (Wallace missed a birdie at the ninth), and I didn’t, and then went to a playoff and it got a little bit more serious than how the nine holes went,” Wallace said. “I guess I just I wanted to win this. I want to break history somewhat.”

Wallace tied Lyle with a five-under 22, which included this ace at No. 8:As Wallace alluded, no one has captured the Par 3 Contest and Masters in the same week. (Media members reminding their audiences no one has won the Par 3 and Masters in the same week: a true tradition unlike any other.) But there have been close calls, with Raymond Floyd (1990) and Chip Beck (1993) finishing runner-up.

Wallace, who won three times on the Euro Tour last season, will tee off with Bernhard Langer and Alvaro Ortiz at 12:10 p.m. on Thursday.

Finau returns to scene of crime

On April’s Fools Day, Tony Finau and Nike “released” the Finau1, a shoe with exaggerated ankle support. A sneaker that gave a not-so-subdued, and sardonic, nod to Finau’s gruesome injury at the 2018 Par 3 Contest.
However, Wednesday proved that fake boot is very much real, as the 29-year-old broke out the high, hightop at the seventh hole, the scene of the crime last spring.

The 2019 Masters is nearly here, starting off the 83rd edition of this storied event at Augusta National. While this tournament does have the smallest field of any of the four golf majors, it boasts all the best talent on tour. In addition to the 20 past champions that will tee off beginning on Thursday—these players secure the right to compete in the Masters for life by earning a green jacket—there are 67 other contenders all seeking the glory that winning this tourney brings.

It’s a tough major to predict a winner for, but some players are currently standing out as having the most potential to win the Masters in 2019. Before seeing who pro handicapper Jon Price of has pegged to top the leaderboard at the conclusion of Sunday’s final round at Augusta National, have a look at the full schedule, tee times, pairings, TV and live stream coverage information, updated odds for the field and more for the Masters 2019.

Yes, he’s the favorite. Yes, he’s playing the hottest golf in the world right now. But I’ve been picking McIlroy in this space frequently over the last few years, and it’s been all for naught. Not this time.

Not while I’m attending Augusta National for the first time and have watched him smoke the ball off the practice tees. Rory McIlroy is going to win the Masters. He’s the easy chose for a top 10 lock each year or a backdoor top five, but I think he gets it done here. Let’s just say … it’s in the air.

Masters

Masters 2019 Live : The Masters 2019 sacred phones is prohibited on the sacred site of the Augusta National Golf Club, which makes the game nostalgic. Tournament tees off on Thursday, April 11 at Augusta National, officially starting up the first golf major of the season. Rainstorms threaten delays at fabled golf tournament.

It’s that time of the year where everyone in the golf world has one question on their mind: Who are you picking to win the 2019 Masters? With an 87-man field featuring generational talent going head-to-head at Augusta National, rarely has such a call ever been more difficult.

All eyes are on Rory McIlroy this year as The Ulsterman looks to complete his career grand slam, but there’s some stiff competition throughout the field, namely from many of his young contemporaries like Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas and Rickie Fowler. Of course, we would be remiss without mentioning Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, both of whom are among a litany of names looking to add another green jacket to their respective collections.

Simply put, this field for the Masters is loaded with stars, including many who have already played tremendous golf in 2019 both on the PGA Tour and worldwide. Narrowing this down to a champion and top finishers is a tough task, but we here at CBS Sports are certainly up to it. Take a look at our 1-87 ranking of the Masters field, and figure out when your favorites will tee off with our list of Thursday tee times.

So who will win the 2019 Masters, and which long shots will stun the golfing world? Visit SportsLine now to see the full projected 2019 Masters leaderboard from the model that nailed Patrick Reed’s victory last year, and find out.

It’s that time of the year where everyone in the golf world has one question on their mind: Who are you picking to win the 2019 Masters? With an 87-man field featuring generational talent going head-to-head at Augusta National, rarely has such a call ever been more difficult.

All eyes are on Rory McIlroy this year as The Ulsterman looks to complete his career grand slam, but there’s some stiff competition throughout the field, namely from many of his young contemporaries like Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas and Rickie Fowler. Of course, we would be remiss without mentioning Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, both of whom are among a litany of names looking to add another green jacket to their respective collections.

Simply put, this field for the Masters is loaded with stars, including many who have already played tremendous golf in 2019 both on the PGA Tour and worldwide. Narrowing this down to a champion and top finishers is a tough task, but we here at CBS Sports are certainly up to it. Take a look at our 1-87 ranking of the Masters field, and figure out when your favorites will tee off with our list of Thursday tee times.

So who will win the 2019 Masters, and which long shots will stun the golfing world? Visit SportsLine now to see the full projected 2019 Masters leaderboard from the model that nailed Patrick Reed’s victory last year, and find out.

Top 10 lock — Rory McIlroy: He hasn’t finished outside the top 10 here since 2013 and hasn’t finished outside the top 10 in any tournament in 2019. I don’t know what else to tell you.

Top 5 in order: Justin Thomas, Rory McIlroy, Matt Kuchar, Dustin Johnson, Bryson DeChambeau

Surprise prediction: I don’t know if it’s a surprise, but I think Tiger Woods is going to contend early and fade late. He’s coming in with better form than people think, but I think the weight of opening 68-69 will legitimately get to him on the weekend, and he’ll fade to a T15 or something like that. But boy, those first two and a half days will be something.

The Masters

The Masters 2019 Live : The Masters Tournament begins Thursday morning when 87 golfers competing for the fabled green jacket tee off at Augusta National Golf club. The 2019 Masters Tournament will be the 83rd edition of the Masters Tournament and the first of golf’s four major championships to be held in 2019. It will be held from April 11–14 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia.

The Masters Tournament begins Thursday morning when 87 golfers competing for the fabled green jacket tee off at Augusta National Golf club. But a persistent rainstorm could delay parts of the tournament.

The Weather Channel says there’s a 60 percent chance of rain in Augusta, Georgia, on Friday. On Saturday there’s an 80 percent chance of rain, and it’s even higher on Sunday, during final-round play.

While Augusta National features a SubAir drainage system to handle any rain, the threat of thunderstorms and lightning is the main issue heading into the weekend. The course had to suspend practice play Monday and Tuesday due to inclement weather.

Masters tournaments have occasionally been affected by problematic weather since the tournament’s inauguration in 1934, including seven straight Masters from 2002 to 2008 that experienced weather delays.

The players don’t necessarily always play through rain, but they do continue golfing once the rain abates and the course is soaked dry by the drainage system. Even so, the ball is always affected by changes to Augusta’s surface and landscape. And, as any golfer knows, a delay can throw off rhythm and momentum.

Tournament play officially begins Thursday morning for 87 of the best golfers on Earth. The Masters will conclude Sunday afternoon, April 14.

Few sporting venues televise as beautifully as the lush fairways of the Augusta National: but following the Masters on TV in the UK can be a tricky par to make for the armchair fan. Here is our beginner’s guide to watching this most exclusive and esoteric of events.

Augusta famously likes to keep certain people out if it possibly can, and some of those people are television viewers. The organisers high-handedly forbid coverage of the start, meaning that the Sky Sports coverage will pick the action up midway through the first round. Making the best of it, the broadcaster will show “featured groups” and particular holes throughout the afternoon but actual real, honest-to-goodness live coverage does not begin until 8pm. In a sporting era where satellite channels are constantly ramming Under-11 Hide and Seek Premier League into your eye-sockets 24-7, it’s actually agreeably quaint not to see every minute of event; perhaps a rare dash of less-is-more all adds to the Masters’ undeniable mystique.

There’s tantalising glimpses and the tease of denial, though, and then there’s just plain weird and withholding. Which brings us to the BBC, who are not allowed to show anything on Thursday and then have day one highlights on the evening of day two at 7pm, leading to the frankly bizarre situation where you’re watching action 24 hours or more out of date while the game is still afoot. Still, we are where we are, and there is no doubt that BBC make a fine job of it once they do get going in earnest on day three from 7.30pm and then Sunday’s climax from 6.30pm.

The BBC have absolutely superb radio coverage but, for this viewer at least, Sunday night on the sofa with the Masters denouement is one of the sporting television calendar’s essential dates. As to the question of whether to follow on Sky or BBC, we are all surely in one camp or the other by now and, as with other debates around at the moment, we are not going to have our view changed by debate.

One notable change this year, though: Sky’s excellent host David Livingstone has retired, meaning that Nick Dougherty will be fronting the coverage this year, alongside regulars Butch Harmon and Paul McGinley. Harmon’s acute insights, easy manner and close relationship with many of the American players, partly via his supercoach son Claude, makes him one of the most watchable analysts across any sport. In addition to Sarah Stirk getting the immediate reaction of the players post-round, Sky have their usual array of bells, whistles and gizmos: holograms, 360 degree hole analysis, ball trackers, scratch-and-sniff iPads and so on.